A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

This green gooseberry wine recipe is simple, but as is often the case, even if you do everything else right, putting in too much sugar, or it failing to clear are occasional, but not insurmountable problems ... as can be read below and in the other gooseberry wine recipe blend post.

3.5 Lbs of Green Gooseberries
7 pints of boiling water
1 crushed campden tablet
1 tsp pectic enzyme
1 litre of White Aldi grape juice, or 1 Lb of Sultanas or 1 pint of strong tea.
1 tsp citric acid or 1 lemon's juice
2-3 Lbs of sugar
2 tsp of yeast nutrients
An all purpose white yeast

Gooseberry wine differs from most wine making methods in that you spend a week stirring the skins to release the flavour. Then once you've strained the pulp out, you're then warming the sugar in your gooseberry juice until it dissolves - Don't use too much sugar immediately, 2.5 Lbs is enough at this stage. My rule is of thumb is as always, only add as much sugar as you need to reach an SG of say 1.080 - 1.085 and that will almost guarantee a dry ferment at 12%.

When the mix is in the demijohn, you can always top up with sugar syrup or even honey to get up to 1.085 if the SG is low.

A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

This raspberry and red currant wine recipe is easy. It clears so fast, matures so quickly and shines so brightly it's worth making as much as you can. With the raisins and grape juice the wine will develop more depth to the body colour and stay unmistakably fruity.

1.5 Lbs of Raspberries
1.5 Lbs of Red Currants
1/2 Pound of Raisins
1/2 litre of Red Aldi Rio D'Oro grape juice
6 pints of water
1 campden tablet
1 tsp Pectolase
2-3 Lbs sugar
1 lemon or 1 tsp Citric Acid
1 tsp TronOzymol
Bordeaux Yeast or Harvest VR21 Yeast

You can see from the record below that without using a hydrometer I put too much sugar in. As a rule of thumb: Only add as much sugar as you need to reach an SG of say 1.080 - 1.085 and that will almost guarantee a dry ferment at 12%.

A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

This recipe is the basic idea for a red currant and plum wine recipe. It should come out a rich amber red colour depending on the variety and colour of the plums. I suspect a late season redcurrant and an early plum would be necessary without a freezer.

This red currant wine recipe with plum was to save one of the red currant wines that was too sweet. By this time it had been divided so much I didn't even have half a gallon of straight red currant left. It was over 3 pints and so it was the largest single constituent.

If you read the record below the story of this recipe is outrageous. There was honey in there and I ended up starting one of the stuck gallons with a new half gallon of Damson wine!

2 lb Red Currants
2 Lb of Plums
6 pints of water
1 campden tablet
1 tsp pectolase
2-3  Lbs of sugar
1 litre of Red Aldi Rio D'Oro grape juice or a pound of Raisins
1 lemon or 1 tsp Citric Acid
2 tsp TronOzymol yeast nutrient
Bordeaux or Burgundy yeast if you don't have one of the Harvest yeasts for red wine.

Drip strain the must into the demijohn, I find that squeezing plum pulp lets too much sediment into the demijohn.

As a rule of thumb for adding sugar: Use a hydrometer and add sugar only a few Oz at a time. Aiming for a starting point around 1.085 is perfectly adequate to end up with a 90 point drop and a 12% wine almost guaranteed.

If you look closely at my records below, you'll find a couple more plum wine recipes too!

A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

This elderberry and blackberry wine recipe is the same as any port style wine recipe, you need 5 Lbs of fruit in any combination and a port wine yeast, some patience a hydrometer and paper for notes of SG drops so you know when to stop adding sugar!

2.5 Lbs of Elderberries
2.5 Lbs of Blackberries
7 pints of boiling water
1 crushed campden tablet
1 tsp pectic enzyme
1 tsp citric acid or 1 lemon's juice
2-3 Lbs of sugar
1 tsp of yeast nutrients
Ritchies Pot Wine Yeast

Whatever elderberry wine recipe you choose, don't add any tannin. If you have elderberries in a recipe, you don't need to add grape juice, raisins or tea ... Also, you can use a few more and get a real heavy body to the wine.
One other thing, while I totally love elderflower, I really dislike a strong elderberry flavour, but this wine when it's mature is wonderful.

A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

Whatever elderberry wine recipe you choose, don't add any tannin. If you have elderberries in a recipe, you don't need to add grape juice, raisins or tea ... Also, you can use a few more and get  a real heavy body to the wine.

3 Lbs of Elderberries
7 pints of boiling water
1 crushed campden tablet
1 tsp pectic enzyme
1 tsp citric acid or 1 lemon's juice
2-3 Lbs of sugar
1 tsp of yeast nutrients
Good yeast for Red Wine

My rule is of thumb is really only add as much sugar as you need to reach an SG of say 1.080 - 1.085 and that will almost guarantee a dry ferment at 12%.

An elderberry wine recipe that anyone, novice, n00b or expert can have a go at. September is a perfect time for elderberries and walking in the countryside looking for these darlings.

One other thing, while I totally love elderflower, I really dislike a strong elderberry flavour, but this wine when it's mature is wonderful.

A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

This green gooseberry wine recipe is simple, but it went wrong for me as can be read below and in the other gooseberry wine recipe post.

2.5 Lbs of Green Gooseberries
1 Lb of other fruit or frozen berries
7 pints of boiling water
1 crushed campden tablet
1 tsp pectic enzyme
1 litre of White or Red Aldi grape juice depending on the colour you want to end up with.
1 tsp citric acid or 1 lemon's juice
2-3 Lbs of sugar
2 tsp of yeast nutrients
Gervin's varietal D wine yeast.

It's a different method from most wine recipes, in that once you've strained the juice, you're then warming the sugar in your gooseberry juice until it dissolves - Don't use too much sugar immediately, 2.5 Lbs is enough at this stage. When I put 2 Lbs of sugar in I ended up at 1.070 but my gooseberries were very ripe and sweet with natural sugars - You might not be so lucky. My rule is of thumb is as always, only add as much sugar as you need to reach an SG of say 1.080 - 1.085 and that will almost guarantee a dry ferment at 12%.

When the mix is in the demijohn, you can always top up with sugar syrup or even honey to get up to 1.085 if the SG is low.

A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

This sloe wine recipe is a classic full bodied red. I must admit to loving sloes. I love their colour and I love this sloe wine recipe. We waited 12 months to taste it, now we'll leave it a lot longer.

4 lb Sloes (Blackthorn)
3" piece of ginger root
6 pints of water
1 campden tablet
1 tsp pectolase
2-3  Lbs of sugar
1/2 litre of Red Aldi Rio D'Oro grape juice or a pound of Raisins
1 lemon or 1 tsp Citric Acid
2 tsp TronOzymol yeast nutrient
Ritchies Sherry yeast

Damsons and Sloes are high in pectin so maybe 1 1/2 tsp of pectic enzyme (pectolase) could be used. Also you can see in the record below while foraging I'd found half a pound of Blackberries, Elderberries & Bullace and they were all pitched in.

As a rule of thumb for adding sugar: Use a hydrometer and add sugar only a few Oz at a time stirring well so you can take another reading. Aim for a starting point around 1.085. 1.080 is a perfectly adequate point to end up with a 90 point drop to dryness and a guaranteed 12% wine.

Editorial: In January 2012 we tried our first taste of this sloe wine and I can attest that it's better than I imagined while we were waiting for it to mature.

A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

This sloe wine recipe is a classic full bodied red. I must admit to loving sloes. I love their colour and I love this sloe wine recipe. We waited 12 months to taste it, now we'll leave it a lot longer.

4 lb Sloes (Blackthorn)
3" piece of ginger root
6 pints of water
1 campden tablet
1 tsp pectolase
2-3  Lbs of sugar
1/2 litre of Red Aldi Rio D'Oro grape juice or a pound of Raisins
1 lemon or 1 tsp Citric Acid
2 tsp TronOzymol yeast nutrient
Ritchies Sherry yeast

Damsons and Sloes are high in pectin so maybe 1 1/2 tsp of pectic enzyme (pectolase) could be used. Also you can see in the record below while foraging I'd found half a pound of Blackberries, Elderberries & Bullace and they were all pitched in.

As a rule of thumb for adding sugar: Use a hydrometer and add sugar only a few Oz at a time stirring well so you can take another reading. Aim for a starting point around 1.085. 1.080 is a perfectly adequate point to end up with a 90 point drop to dryness and a guaranteed 12% wine.

Editorial: In January 2012 we tried our first taste of this sloe wine and I can attest that it's better than I imagined while we were waiting for it to mature.

A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

This blackcurrant and blackberry wine recipe isn't seasonally possible without using a freezer and using sloes it'll be October/November before you make this baby.

2 Lbs of Blackcurrants frozen in July or August
2 Lbs of Blackberries fresh from the hedgerow in September
1 Lb of another fruit. (I chose Plums & Raisins (You could easily use a Litre of Aldi red grape juice instead) and later I added Sloe wine which you could do by waiting a little longer to pick the Sloes by freezing the Blackberries until then.)

1 gallon water
1 crushed campden tablet
1 tsp pectic enzyme
1 tsp citric acid or juice of 1 lemon
2.5 Lbs of sugar in 3 x 14 Oz batches
1 tsp of yeast nutrients
Ritchies Port Wine Yeast

The thing to be careful of here is not adding too much sugar, you're doing it in 3 stages so you need to make notes so that you don't put so much sugar in that it will kill the yeast before finishing. A drop of 110 points will give you 15% alcohol

A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

This is another house special wine blend. If you read through the several plum wine recipe posts, it would seem that I have messed up at least 2 batches of plum wine. However, I didn't intend to create any single fruit plum wine. I made 3 gallons specifically to blend with the various gallons that HAD messed up. A straight plum wine recipe is simply this:

4 Lb's of ripe Plums
6 pints of water
1 tsp Pectolase
1/2 litre Red Aldi Rio D'Oro grape juice or 8 Oz Raisins for tannin
2.5 Lb Sugar
1 tsp Citric Acid or 1 lemon's juice
1 tsp of yeast nutrients
A good red wine yeast

Drip strain the must though muslin, squeezing will take longer to clear and plum wine takes a long time to mature too, so unless you want to wait 18 months, drip strain :)

A rule is of thumb is as always: Only add as much sugar as you need to reach an SG of say 1.080 - 1.085 and that will almost guarantee a dry ferment at 12%.

A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

Any crab apple wine recipe is straightforward, but if you have yellow or green crab apples use white grape juice and sultanas, but if they are red use raisins and red grape juice.

Whichever crab apples you have you can spend hours cutting them open and removing the pips by hand, or you can freeze them, crush them after the boiling water cools and skim the pips from the surface while the campden tablet is working.

You can see from the record below I used half a gallon of crab apples to blend with blackberry, plum and gooseberry wines so I called it Crab Apple Surprise!, but this crab apple wine recipe is straight.

3.5 Lbs of Crab Apples (These were red)
8 Oz of Raisins or 1/2 litre of red Aldi grape juice
4 pints of boiling water
1 crushed campden tablet
1/2 tsp pectic enzyme
1/2 tsp citric acid or 1/2 a lemon's juice
1.25 Lbs of sugar
1/2 tsp of yeast nutrients
Gervin Varietal D Yeast

A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

The title's a little too long, but the flavour is exceptional ... so here is my port style damson sloe and elderberry wine recipe

You need 5 Lb's of mixed fruits (In this case it was Damson, Sloe and Elderberry)
7 pints of boiling water
1/2 litre of preservative free grape juice, 8 Oz of Raisins or 1/2 pint of strong tea
1 crushed campden tablet
1 tsp pectic enzyme
1 tsp citric acid or 1 lemon's juice
2.5-3 Lbs of sugar
2 tsp of yeast nutrients
Ritchies Port Wine yeast

My rule is of thumb with a port wine is make a lot of calculations so you actually know what the drop is on the hydrometer - If it's already fallen 90 pts during the first two sugar additions, then don't drop another Lb of sugar in or you'll have a sweet wine that will be stuck over SG: 1.000

A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

Here's a mead wine recipe featuring orange, cinnamon and cloves, it's not the traditional method of fermenting with the ingredients in the cask and this honey mead still tastes great … This would be called a Metheglyn mead because of the spices.

First things first: Honey has no natural nutrients so needs a lot of yeast nutrients.
Honey doesn't ferment as fast as sugar so a little more patience might be needed.

When I was a young teenager in the South West of England getting hold of scrumpy or Mead was the most enjoyable use for alcohol. Back then, scrumpy was rough, usually flavoured with dead rat and Mead Wine was thick, sweet and liqueur-like ... and they both worked well on the tongue and senses.

However, I've not been able to recreate either, but this is a Mead Wine Recipe that worked for me.

3 Lbs of Honey
4 pints of boiling water
Added zest and pulp from an orange
30 Cloves
1 Large piece of cinnamon bark
Added a very strong mug of tea for tannin
2-3 tsp of TronOzymol yeast nutrients
Gervin Wine Yeast #1 Strain GV1

When topping this Mead Wine up use a hydrometer. Only add as much honey water as you need to reach an SG of say 1.080 - 1.085 and that will almost guarantee a dry ferment at 12%.

A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

This is the traditional method of making mead wine, in the cask with oranges and spices. This honey mead wine recipe is an authentic honey flavoured wine enjoyed for centuries across a dozen cultures.

First things first: Honey has no natural nutrients so needs a lot of yeast nutrients.
Honey doesn't ferment as fast as sugar so a little more patience might be needed.

When I was a young teenager in the South West of England getting hold of scrumpy or Mead was the most enjoyable use for alcohol. Back then, scrumpy was rough, usually flavoured with dead rat and Mead Wine was thick, sweet and liqueur-like ... and they both worked well on the tongue and senses.

However, I've not been able to recreate either, but this is another Mead Wine Recipe that works. This honey mead wine recipe is unusual in that traditionally the fruit and spices are left in the demijohn - I've never done this with any other wine recipe, but the great thing is that when all the orange pieces float to the mead surface, the fermentation is complete. (I suggest you use a hydrometer as a more reliable indicator)

3 Lbs of Honey
4 pints of boiling water
Handfull of Raisins for tannin
Some cinnamon bark
1 whole orange, sliced no pith.
1/2 Orange zest
1 whole lemon zest
1 pinch of caribbean allspice
1 pinch of nutmeg
1 clove
Added a very strong mug of tea for more tannin
2-3 tsp of TronOzymol yeast nutrients
Young's All Purpose yeast

When topping this Mead Wine up use a hydrometer. After you remove the pulp from the demijohn this mead wine will need topping up back to the neck. So use a hydrometer to note the beginning SG and the straining SG before adding too much Honey water. Only add as much honey water as you need to reach a combined SG drop of not more than 100 points by the time it finishes at 0.995 or so.

A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

Yay! The year's final clear up of the red top-ups, leftovers, over-sweet nasty frustrating tear-jerking non fermenting fridge content that Katriona is happy to be rid of.

It's October, it's a house wine, so it must be an October surprise house wine recipe and probably the best blend ever!

A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

This Elderflower and Apple wine recipe is how I'd make it today, this was originally blended after the fact. Something done in grape wine making to achieve the right flavours and bouquet, or to mask a bad year with a good one.

I've added a few variations within the recipe depending on the colour of your crab apples. And if you had a lot of elderflower heads in your vicinity, you could use 25 elderflower blossoms and drop the crab apples completely ... I'd call that elderflower wine recipe "elderflower cordial with Sauternes yeast" ;)

12 Elderflower Heads
1.5 Lbs of Crab Apples
Zest of 1 lemon (grated)
7 pints of boiling water
1 crushed campden tablet
1 tsp pectic enzyme
1/2 tsp citric acid or half a lemon's juice
1/2 litre of Aldi Rio D'Oro grape juice, white if you'd prefer to keep the colour of the fruit, red if you want a blusher wine, but you need it for tannin. 8 Oz of Sultanas is an alternative or a 1/2 pint of strong tea.
2-3 Lbs of sugar
2 tsp of yeast nutrients
Harvest MA 33 yeast for Red Crab Apples for a blush wine
Sauternes for Yellow Crab Apples for a light amber wine
Sauternes for Regular Apples for a whiter wine

I would recommend using crab apples in this recipe. Freeze them, then thaw in the bucket. You'll be able to crush them with your fingers once the boiling water has been thrown in. (when cooler)
Over the next few days you'll be stirring the must to get the flavours into the water so you can skim off the apple pips as you go.

My rule is of thumb is  as always, only add as much sugar as you need to reach an SG of say 1.080 - 1.085 and that will almost guarantee a dry ferment at 12%.

A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

I'd like to blend Crab Apples with Cherries, it feels like it could be a tart or a pie ... anyway, I don't think I started out to write a crab apple and cherry wine recipe, I was told I had to make space in the freezer, with all the cattery work we needed more freezer space for ready meals because there's no time to cook in the summer!

I guess that a good crab apple and cherry wine recipe would blend the fruits best characteristics together to complement each other, a tart crab apple and a sweet dessert cherry for example might fight to obliterate each other but end up smoothly balanced and distinctly separate on the palette.

Half Gallon Crab Apple Wine Recipe

2 Lbs of Crab Apples (Mine were red/yellow)
4 pints of boiling water
1 crushed campden tablet
1/2 tsp pectic enzyme
1/2 tsp citric acid or 1/2 a lemon's juice
1.25 Lbs of sugar
1/2 tsp of yeast nutrients

Half Gallon Cherry Wine Recipe

2 Lbs of Cherries (Mine were red dessert cherries)
4 pints of boiling water
1 crushed campden tablet
1/2 tsp pectic enzyme
1/2 tsp citric acid or 1/2 a lemon's juice
1.25 Lbs of sugar
1/2 tsp of yeast nutrients

Once you have both half gallons, check the SG of both, add the numbers together and halve that number.
That'll give you the SG before you mix them together.
If the SG is above 1.090 don't mix them, go find some more fruit and put less sugar in!
If the figure is below 1.080 add sugar until it's around 1.085.
My rule is of thumb is really only add as much sugar as you need to reach an SG of say 1.080 - 1.085 and that will almost guarantee a dry ferment at 12%.

A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

This strawberry and boysenberry wine recipe is not unusual from a seasonal point of view, I had fresh Elsanta strawberries from Sparkford and fresh Boysenberries from Chosen Hill Farm. Even though I wrote this as a strawberry and boysenberry wine recipe the berries here are interchangeable. I mean let’s face it, you’re going to be lucky to find any Boysbenberry canes in the hedgerows. Supermarkets have a frozen fruit area, they usually have names like 'summer fruits' but sometimes they are tropical under-ripe rubbish. Most organic farm shops have boxes of frozen fruit, so if you have the strawberries, replace the boysenberries with some frozen supermarket berries.

As always, be careful adding the sugar. As a rule of thumb for adding sugar: Use a hydrometer and add sugar only a few Oz at a time stirring well so you can take another reading. Aim for a starting point around 1.085. 1.080 is a perfectly adequate point to end up with a 90 point drop to dryness and a guaranteed 12% wine.

1.5 Lbs Strawberries (sliced)
1.5 Lbs of Boysenberries (crushed)
6 pints of water
1 campden tablet
1 tsp pectolase
1/2 litre of Red Aldi Rio D'Oro grape juice or 8 Oz of Raisins
1 lemon or 1 tsp Citric Acid
2Lb 12 Oz White Sugar
1 tsp TronOzymol yeast nutrient
Harvest VR21 Yeast

A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

This strawberry and raspberry wine recipe is not unusual from a seasonal point of view, I had picked fresh Elsanta strawberries and Glen Ample raspberries from Sparkford so it's a perfect seasonal mix.

Most organic farm shops have boxes of frozen fruit that could inspire you, so if you only have enough strawberries or raspberries growing in your garden for an occasional treat, scour the supermarket shelves for sell by date bargains or look through the frozen supermarket berries.

As always, be careful adding the sugar. As a rule of thumb for adding sugar: Use a hydrometer and add sugar only a few Oz at a time stirring well so you can take another reading. Aim for a starting point around 1.085. 1.080 is a perfectly adequate point to end up with a 90 point drop to dryness and a guaranteed 12% wine.

1.5 Lbs Strawberries (sliced)
1.5 Lbs of Raspberries (crushed)
6 pints of water
1 campden tablet
1 tsp pectolase
1/2 litre of Red Aldi Rio D'Oro grape juice or 8 Oz of Raisins
1 lemon or 1 tsp Citric Acid
2Lb 12 Oz White Sugar
1 tsp TronOzymol yeast nutrient
Harvest VR21 Yeast

From my record below the ingredients I used included, Light Brown Sugar, Dark Muscavado Sugar & Wildflower Honey, so don't be shy about not following recipes to the letter. If you come up with a total winner, you'll have created your own family recipe!

A Tiger Barn Cattery Wine Recipe

This sloe and raspberry wine recipe is unusual in that it's not a seasonal mix, but I had fresh raspberries from Sparkford and the sloes in the freezer from the previous year. But you ferment together just by crushing them separately in 3 pints of boiling water then add the juices together. Or you can crush all the fruit together in one fermentation bucket. After the primary fermentation you can sieve the stones and seeds out quickly then strain it through a muslin or nylon straining bag for a very clean demijohn ready liquid.

A sloe and raspberry wine recipe is a great early summer wine if you saved some sloes in the freezer from the previous year ... or you can buy some dried in most hop shops. Some raspberries mature in late June and it's a good way to get a deep red wine off early in the wine making year after you've made your white Elderflower Wine.

As always, be careful adding the sugar, according to this record, mine stuck. As a rule of thumb for adding sugar: Use a hydrometer and add sugar only a few Oz at a time stirring well so you can take another reading. Aim for a starting point around 1.085. 1.080 is a perfectly adequate point to end up with a 90 point drop to dryness and a guaranteed 12% wine.

2 lb Sloes (Blackthorn Fruit)
1.5-2 Lb of Raspberries
6 pints of water
1 campden tablet
1 1/2 tsp pectolase
2-3  Lbs of sugar
1 litre of Red Aldi Rio D'Oro grape juice or a pound of Raisins
1 lemon or 1 tsp Citric Acid
2 tsp TronOzymol yeast nutrient
Ritchies Sherry yeast

Damsons and Sloes are notoriously high in pectin so maybe 1 1/2 tsp of pectic enzyme (pectolase) is a good idea to keep the wine clear of haze.

Putting too much sugar in without taking an SG reading is the most common mistake in wine making - A rule is of thumb is as always: Only add as much sugar as you need to reach an SG of say 1.080 - 1.085 and that will almost guarantee a dry ferment at 12%.